Category - What We’re Reading

16
Jun

What We’re Reading: June 16, 2015

In this edition: A high-tech city (population: zero) in the New Mexican desert; more proof that widening a road doesn’t solve its congestion problems; where Millennials can’t afford a home.

2
Jun

What We’re Reading: June 2, 2015

In this edition: Improving transit without breaking the bank; Huntsville continues its rise to the top; a general store announces a Downtown location.

19
May

What We’re Reading: May 19, 2015

In this edition: An Australian city that excels in placemaking; Millennials are moving to the suburbs (sort of); high-speed rail in the Southeast. 

5
May

What We’re Reading: May 5, 2015

Photo credit: Flickr/tomspix In this edition: Two different places– a “New South” city  and America’s most famous tech hub– deal with the consequences of sprawl; bike-sharing comes to Birmingham; a Philadelphia project combines two of our favorite things: parks and beer. 

23
Apr

What We’re Reading: April 23, 2015

In this edition: Shared streets are becoming more common; Cool urban parks; How many American adults can’t ride a bike?

7
Apr

What We’re Reading: April 7, 2015

In this edition: Public markets are coming back in New Orleans; “Parklets” and their impact on businesses; a fire station in the most unlikely of places. 

24
Mar

What We’re Reading: March 24, 2015

In this edition: Are Americans driving more (again)?; Why “road diets” aren’t that bad; a disaster in Washington state prompts a property-rights debate. 

10
Mar

What We’re Reading: March 10, 2015

In this edition: With the BIG Picture Citizens Academy on Transportation later this month, this WWR is dedicated completely to the topic. 

24
Feb

What We’re Reading: February 24, 2015

In this edition: What Downtown Huntsville lost to “urban renewal;” a new trend in housing could make more single Americans homeowners; a new “Sprawl Index” gives Huntsville low marks. 

9
Feb

What We’re Reading: February 10, 2015

In this edition: The scope of transportation engineering is changing; a “new” form of housing is becoming more popular thanks to empty-nesters; debunking migration myths. 

Page 5 of 7